Interlude…

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

It was a few weeks ago now… Well, as we couldn’t set off for Scotland, thanks to ‘stuff’ showing up on the scans the day I was meant to leave for the north, Stuart came down here. Perhaps we could, at least, touch base with some of our favourite places. After being unable to enter our little rainbow chapel, thanks to the Covid restrictions, we probably ought to have checked whether Rollright would be accessible… but instead, off we went, determined to have at least one decent day of our holiday!

And, as always, Rollright opened its arms to us. It is one of the friendliest of stone circles. Possibly that may be just because it is so accessible and easily visited, although I think there is more to it than that. It is a place of welcome. It likes people… their presence and joy… Call that daft, if you…

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A Zombie’s Morning Ritual, Reveals A New Day With Expanding Options – Daily Quote 

Jo Hawk

you-cant-cross-the-sea-merely-by-standing-and-staring-at-the-water.-rabindranath-tagore

Each morning a zombie rises, moaning, and groaning it stumbles downstairs to its laboratory. The zombie staggers to the coffeepot. Flailing arms create splashing water, and coffee grounds litter the countertop like confetti on New Year’s Eve. It grumbles and waits, then fills a cup with wake-up juice.

A sip of the black witch’s brew and the transformation begins. My eyelids separate, the world comes into focus, and I see my goals on the horizon.

I consider my options. I could swim, build a boat, rent a wave runner, find a ferry, or book a seat on a private jet. The exact method is whichever one moves me forward, advancing me closer to my goal. I know I must act because I am not content to stand on the shore and dream.

How will you cross the sea?

_________________________________________

Keep on writing.

Jo Hawk The Writer

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House of Sorrow Playlist #WIP Wednesday

Joan Hall

Hey, everyone. It’s been ages since I’ve done a WIP Wednesday post. The past few weeks, I turned my focus from Cold Dark Night toward finishing the short story prequel. Originally titled Woman in Black, it has a new name, House of Sorrow.

As is often the case, the story took me in a slightly different direction than I originally expected. But I had so much fun writing it. Many of the scenes are set in the late 1960s. Let’s say I was able to relive some of my childhood while writing and doing research.

When I neared completion of the first draft, it dawned on me that I was missing a golden opportunity by not creating a playlist. I did that with all my Driscoll Lake novels and often listen to them on Spotify while driving. I was quick to create one for this story.

There are…

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Today is Wednesday 30th September

pensitivity101

Time for me to take some time out.
Don’t worry, I’m just going to take a step or two back and have a breather.
These past few days have been draining, my concentration has gone for a bucket of chalk, and my mind is so weary, I just can’t get my act together.
The Three Things Challenge is scheduled for the rest of the week, but I doubt if there’ll be a Take Seven this week.
I’ll still access my blog for pingbacks and comments but probably won’t be doing so many challenges or posts for a while.

Thanks for all your support. I’m not going anywhere, I just need to regroup.
As always, take care, and keep safe.

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Why Write Wrong? # 8

Story Empire

Hard to believe I’ve already been a member here at Story Empire for seven months! Seems like just yesterday I joined the group.

Funny, though. It’s also been seven months since I got put on house arrest by my doctor. One of these scenarios has passed by a lot more quickly than the other! 😀 Huh. Perspective is everything, isn’t it? 😀

Today, I’m continuing with my #WhyWriteWrong? series. This is the eighth one I’ve shared, and I wish I could find a way to connect that to my opening comments, but alas. I’m not coming up with a thing. 😦 Therefore, I’ll just jump right into today’s trio of words that sound alike, but are spelled differently, and mean very different things. In other words, these three words are homophones.

BRACE YOURSELVES. I’M GOING TO BEGIN WITH A LITTLE STORY!

Ahem. Way, way back, when I was a child…

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God of Dreams

Pen of the Damned

A milk-pale rain fell from a blurred black sky. It tingled softly on my exposed arms. Behind me stood a lake of shimmer. My birthplace, perhaps. I could not remember how I’d gotten here.

I walked, not looking at the path my feet trod. Instead, I stared into the sky, which gradually cleared until I could see a myriad of stars, an entire alien milky way in the shape of a blunt-winged moth. In the aftermath of the rain, peacefulness steamed like humidity on my skin.

I came to an arch so old that plants grew from the soil accumulated in the cracks of the stone. I passed beneath it into an abandoned field grown wild. “I am disembodied,” I said. “I am dreaming.” And I knew what that meant; the rules of normal physics no longer applied to me.

Flight is a blessing for lucid dreamers. I lifted my…

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COLLEEN’S 2020 #BOOK #REVIEWS – “Viking Sagas, The Captivating Tale of Ragnar Lothbrok, Ivar the Boneless, Lagertha, and More, in Their Historical Context” BY AUTHOR, Matt Clayton, @CaptivHistory

Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry

Featuring Your Next Weekend Read!

About this Book

Explore Captivating Viking Sagas

The period between the end of the eighth century CE and the middle of the eleventh is often called the “Viking Age” because this is the period in which Scandinavian people expanded their contacts with the outside world through trade, raiding, exploration, and colonization.

This volume presents a version of Ragnar’s saga compiled from different modern sources, along with information providing additional historical and documentary context, followed by a discussion of some aspects of modern appropriations and representations of ancient Norse culture.

The first section of the book provides a historical context for Ragnar’s saga through an exploration of daily life in ninth-century Scandinavia and of contemporary Viking culture and history.

The text of the saga itself forms the second part of the book, along with notes giving further information about how this version of the saga is…

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