The Sumer Tree – 2018 Edition

Widdershins Worlds

As I contemplate writing this post, the sky is overcast, and the temperature is back down in the low-to-mid-teens after the giddy heights of the last few days. The Mamas and the Papas are singing ‘Monday Monday’ on my favourite interwebs music streaming channel. (AccuRadio)

Not exactly how I thought Summer Solstice was going to look like.

Most of ‘Spring’ was cold and rainy, then we had five (I counted ‘em) halcyon days of glorious balmy SPRING weather … then the gloom returned.

Most of ‘Summer’ (so far) has been gloomy and showery, then we had five (I counted ‘em) days of 30°C over-the-top sunny SUMMER weather … then the gloom returned.

I’m sensing a pattern here.

The pervading overcastness has not been kind to my gardening efforts either.

Hydrangea – gorgeous as usual, but missing at least half of her usual bloomage Hydrangea – gorgeous as usual, but missing at least half of her usual…

View original post 145 more words

Advertisements

Tales from the Port Naain Intelligencer collection Blog Tour – Episode 4 …

Robbie's inspiration

Jim Webster is visiting Michael and I today with Episode 4 of the Tales from the Port Naain Intelligencer collection Blog Tour. These tales feature Benor the
Cartographer, the hero of Jim’s new book A licence to print money, and they are very entertaining.

Episode 4

Heiron leaned back in his seat and pushed his empty plate away. Benor was
still mopping up the remains of his gravy with a slice of bread.
“That was good.”
Benor ate the bread. “You’re right; I will happily recommend ‘The Bridge Inn’
at Tarrant to all my friends.” With that he drained the rest of the beer in
his tankard. It was good enough to tempt him into ordering another one, but
he felt turning up for work smelling of ale, however good, lacked gravitas.
Heiron toyed with his tankard. “I’ve travelled a bit young Benor but I’ve
not travelled enough to place…

View original post 1,385 more words

DRIFTWOOD

My Window

nature-1367682__340 driftwoodDRIFTWOOD

washed up on the shore,
so exquisite, so polished;
Feels like silk in my hands,

For days, weeks or longer
it has travelled,
across oceans and seas,

hammered against rocks
varnished by sand.

Reminding me of many unfortunates,
living in the shady side of our cities,
by gleaming edifices of beauty and wealth;

Driftwood of humanity.

Playthings to those who exploit,
sleeping in doorways, under bridges,
washed up from an ocean of society;
There was no space for them within,

they see the sun, feel the rain,
but can they feel joy?
when their mattress is concrete?

meanwhile we sleep in soft beds
pampered and fed.

How my heart bleeds
wishing to rescue, to help;
Praying those with knowledge will,
as I give my support,

yet the sorrow and helplessness is there.
Around the corner glittering skyscrapers stand
holding wealth beyond sense.

Still, I pick driftwood by the shore,

View original post 21 more words

The 2018 Author Interview Series Featuring Gwen Plano and John Howell

Author Don Massenzio

It’s time for the next subject for my 2018 author interview series. Author interviews are posted every Friday throughout the year.

This week is a two for one special. I’m happy to be interviewing Gwen Plano and John Howell. Gwen and John have just released a book that they co-authored called The Contract. I’m happy to have them both join me in a ‘he said/she said’ type of format.

You can catch up with all of my past author interviews (nearly 200) on my Author Directory page.

If you’re an author interested in being interviewed in this series, I still have limited spots available for 2018. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com

Now, please enjoy this interview with Gwen Plano and John Howell:


Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

Gwen: This is an interesting question, Don. I write because I am…

View original post 1,576 more words

Jaye’s Journal (off the beaten track!)

In an effort to forget my health problems for a while, my journal today will concern itself with a much better topic!

 

JJ.jpg

 

In my wildest dreams, I could never have dreamed what I would be getting up to in my advancing years. Just goes to show how far you can come if you let yourself dream big.

I have always hated anything to do with computers for they are illogical, slow and complicated. I firmly believe they were sent by the devil to drive us all mad. At least, that’s what happens in our house!

But it wasn’t always this way.

There was a time when the idea of a machine with such amazing capabilities did seem like a fantastic advantage. But my first encounter with one, some thirty years ago, probably ruined me for life. This was when it was in its infancy, and you had to upload or input reams of data to do even the simplest thing. My son was playing chess on this strange looking box and I wanted to have a go. What he forgot to mention, was if you made even a small mistake in entering this data (which seemed to take hours) you would get a big fat nothing. Stubbornly, I tried and tried but failed to get it to work.

Fast forward to just a few years ago, when Indie publishing started making headlines.

Despite my earlier disappointment, I felt myself warming to the idea. I wouldn’t have to input masses of data like before, so maybe it would be easier to use. We all know the answer to that supposition, don’t we?

I still hate computers with a passion, but I do appreciate just how wonderful they are if you can learn the ropes. I still have days when I could beat mine to death with a mallet, but this is more to do with my stubborn brain than anything else. Because they can sometimes do so many amazing things, it encourages us mortals to reach for the stars.

Way back at the beginning of my blogging career, I can remember wondering if I would ever write a book, and now I have written three, well, five if you count the non-fiction ones. At the time, I was happily editing Anita’s books. I never thought a muse would bother me.

When it did, I was astonished by just how addictive writing can become. The most surprising thing was the behaviour of my characters. They became like old friends, and I enjoyed their company so much, the first book turned into a series. Even now, they are nagging me to let them loose again!

It has been an amazing and often terrifying journey, from that first ever blog post to eventually formatting e-books, paperback copies and book trailers. Learning how to put a book together was hard, but the writing was the best part, once I convinced myself that it was something I could do, after all.

None of which was easy for the biggest technophobe this side of Microsoft, someone who battles technology every single day for that magical moment when realisation dawns and I finally understands how things work.

I am well past retiring age now, but I am busier than ever and have no intentions of slowing down or stopping, for where would the fun be in that?

This journey still has some mileage, however, for there are a few things I haven’t attempted yet, and several that need improving. So I won’t be putting away my thinking cap just yet.

 As they said when I was at school, “There is always room for improvement…”


 We hope everyone has a lovely weekend! The weather is behaving, so kick off your shoes and enjoy!  Back to work on Monday!!!

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Writer in Residence -#bookcovers – Persuasion by Paul Andruss

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Welcome to the monthly post by Paul Andruss. This time he looks at book covers and their influence on the buying public.. Some interesting experiments that show that time spent on this element of your book is as important as the words inside.

(Andruss) Jane Austen: literary giant or saucy little minx? 

You decide *

They say a picture is worth a thousand words.

What if they were wrong?

What if a picture was worth 60,000 words?

60,000 words is almost the length of an average novel.

What if you could instantly download 60,000 words of high impact, emotion-filled advertising straight into the brains of potential readers in the blink of an eye?

Would you hesitate?

Would you heck as like!

Human beings, and other primates, are unique among mammals in that we see in colour. Our eyes have two kinds of light receptors called cones and rods.

Mammals…

View original post 1,477 more words

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #PsychologicalSuspense The Puppet Master by @Abigail_Author

Rosie Amber

Today’s team review is from Anita, she blogs here https://jenanita01.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Anita has been reading The Puppet Master by Abigail Osborne

31422186

Our Review

I thoroughly enjoyed reading The Puppet Master, despite the sometimes-harrowing content that made it an emotional roller coaster!

Right from the beginning, I empathised with Billie, the sad and traumatised leading lady. I wanted to know why she was so terrified of being found, and who by.

When Adam, the newspaper reporter enters the story, determined to expose Billie for something she was supposed to have done, the tension as he tries to break down her defences is heart-breaking. Gradually, he peels back her protective layers, exposing the raw emotions that hid underneath her fear.

I kept hoping Adam would change his mind when his feelings for her began to grow, and take pity on someone who has already suffered enough, but his need for justice seemed…

View original post 356 more words

…my life gives me writing… my writing gives me life…

Seumas Gallacher

…this ol’ Scots Jurassic scribbler has come to understand that being of a certain age does not necessarily bring enhanced wisdom… indeed, all too often, it highlights remarkable nuttiness… but it can breed the indulgence of pockets of awareness of some self-spun truths… my introverted philosophies can creep out of what remains of the wee grey cells at any time… and I confess, I do enjoy these interludes… one such minor epiphany struck me today… that my life gives me writing… my writing gives me life… my career, travels, experiences, and relationships, spanning more than five decades and four continents, have more than amply filled the mem’ry bank with material for a hundred-fold of the books I’ve written so far… my fiction, as with that of most authors I know, is an amalgam of all I have seen, heard and felt, mixed with a sum’times over-imaginative brain… but it cannot…

View original post 251 more words