Another post from Nebari Bonsai…

Losing trees, Japanese Maple

Brian VFJapanese Maple, Losing Trees May 8, 2021 1 Minute

Almost, anyway. The aggressive wiring, followed by exceptional freezing conditions in January 2020 resulted in a disastrous year for this Japanese Maple. Here it is in December, 2020, as most of the leaves have fallen:

Continue reading over at NEBARI BONSAI to watch the progress on this poor tree!

Another Fascinating/Unusual Bonsai Post…

Just a plain old willow leaf ficus…

Here’s an example of a little tree that you might run across easily, at a retail store or maybe your club’s raffle table. Hell, I’ve seen them at Walmart before. It’s a willow leaf ficus, Ficus salicaria (often misnamed Ficus nerifolia, F. Salicifolia, F. Subulata, et al).

This one happens to be a root cutting , meaning the “trunk” used to be a root off a larger tree that was chopped off during a repot, saving the smaller hair roots, and planted in its own pot.

continue reading what happened to this unusual tree at Adam’s Art & Bonsai Blog

Reblogged from Begin Bonsai

New pot for a Port Jackson fig! (Ficus rubiginosa)

0 Written by dkinzey

Last weekend I repotted my Port Jackson fig from terra-cotta into a proper Japanese bonsai pot by Koyo. I started developing this tree from a sprig in January, 2015. For a progression of the tree from then to August 2020 see: https://beginbonsai.net/2019/03/31/port-jackson-fig-ficus-rubiginosa/

April 17, 2021:
The tree today in its new pot.
January, 2015: The tree when first purchased in 2015.

Continue reading this interesting post over at BEGIN BONSAI

Another Nebari Bonsai lesson…

Bud pinching Japanese Maples

Brian VFDeciduous, Japanese Maple April 17, 2021 1 Minute

In the spring, with healthy Japanese maples, bud-pinching is a common technique to keep internodes short on refined trees. It is a simple procedure, and needs to be performed about daily as Japanese maples are waking up in the spring.

The earlier you can identify the 2nd node and remove it, the shorter the internode will remain. In this example, I’ve waited about a day too long, but it helps illustrate the process.

Here is the extending new shoot:

Continue reading this interesting post over at NEBARI BONSAI

Another Interesting Post from Nebari Bonsai…

Hawthorn winter pruning and wiring

Brian VFDeciduous April 10, 2021 3 Minutes

This hawthorn has grown rather slowly over the last few years, and I attribute it (right or wrong) to my increased use of fungicides. Regardless, over the last few years, I have let it mostly grow, and now it’s time to sort out what it’s done.

The tree has a tendency to throw upward- and downward-growing shoots at junctions. It makes the tree look more ramified than maybe it is, but time to clean it up.

Pop over to NEBARI BONSAI for loads more info and images…

Why Books & Bonsai ?

When we first started blogging nearly ten years ago, we had no clue as to the right or best way to go about it.

Looking around didn’t help like I thought it would, as there seemed to be a million ways to become a blogger.

What didn’t help either, was that I’m not computer literate, at least I wasn’t back then, so needed to find something simple that wouldn’t tax my poor old brain.

Many bloggers were using something called Blogger, so that is where we began our journey.

I found it relatively easy to use, but as time went on, I noticed a lack of traffic. This wouldn’t help with telling the world about our books, so I looked around to see what else I could manage and found WordPress.

The learning curve was a bit steep for me, but I liked the atmosphere and the possible connections. It was positively lively!

It cost a bit, too, but a small price to pay to finally get noticed.

Then there was a difference of opinion over what to call ourselves. We were not fans of the gimmicky labels, and as writers we were advised to use our names, basically so people can get to know us.

We noticed that most bloggers don’t do this. Their sites have proper names, like Myths of the Mirror, Daily Echo, Sun in Gemini, and Pensivity, to name but a few.

Eventually, after much thought and mucking about, we settled on a name that suits both of us. Books & Bonsai.

Books, because we both write, and Bonsai because I love my miniature trees almost as much as writing.  Of course, other subjects find their way onto our website, as our interests are not limited to books and trees!

We would like to take this opportunity to thank all our friends and followers. You really make it a joy to get up in the morning!

A journey with small trees with BeginBonsai.net

Olive (Olea europaea, var. ‘SanFernando’)

0 Written by dkinzey

I have been working on this olive since July, 2011. To see a progression of its development from 2011 to early 2019 see https://beginbonsai.net/2019/01/03/olive-olea-europaea-var-sanfernando/.

February 21, 2021:
The tree today.

Visit BEGINBONSAI.NET to see more wonderful bonsai specimens!

Another Interesting Bonsai Post from Nebari Bonsai…

Bending with rebar

Brian VFJunipers, Kiyozuro, Styling March 27, 2021 2 Minutes

Sometimes wrapping a branch or trunk with wire doesn’t have enough holding power, and using rebar as an anchor point for guy-wires is more effective.

This is my Kiyozuru Itoigawa, purchased from Chikugo-en in L.A…which, from all I have been able to find, is the origin of the cultivar in the US. I bought it to have the cultivar, but wasn’t enamored with the trunk. It has a nice twist at the base, but then straightens out. The yellow line is the area where things get pretty dull.

It has been container-grown and according to Gary Ishii, it was 25-30 years old when I bought it. Growing slowly in a pot means the trunk is stiff with dense wood. Therefore, wiring the straight portion isn’t really an option.

Continue reading at NEBARI BONSAI

Repotting a Japanese Maple

Brian VFJapanese Maple, repotting March 20, 2021 1 Minute

I didn’t get around to repotting this one last year, and it was the first time I skipped a year repotting it in probably 15 years, so I wasn’t looking forward to wrestling it free, and working the roots all the way back. However, it was pretty weak last year, and so the roots weren’t too crazy. Here are some shots of the process, which took about 90 minutes.

Unpotted:

Pot cleaned and new drainage mesh applied. 3rd generation Yamaaki. I love this pot with this tree, but the clay is developing small chips around the tie down holes, and one foot. The tree may also be ready for the next size up soon. This one is 19″ wide, and a 20″ would work. But the color is fantastic with the fiery red spring foliage.

Continue to read this fascinating post over at NEBARI BONSAI