The Ice Killer: A gripping, chilling crime thriller that you won’t be able to put down (The DI Barton Series Book 3) #Review

Winter is coming, and DI Barton is facing the toughest case of his career…

The Ice Killer

Ellen Toole’s therapist told her to forget the past, but with her family story shrouded in secrecy, that’s easier said than done. The approaching long nights of winter loom threateningly in front of her, and with her mother on her death bed, Ellen has never felt more alone. When it becomes clear that her mother has kept secrets about a history darker than Ellen ever imagined, Ellen must find answers about the past if she has any hope for a future.

DI Barton and his team are still recovering from a particularly tough and grisly case, so a report of a kidnapping, followed by the discovery of two dead bodies, is the last thing they need. There’s a murderer on the loose, and the killer needs to be stopped before they strike again. This winter, there will be vengeance on Ellen’s mind, and DI Barton will struggle with his hardest case to date.

How can Barton find the truth, when all the victims and witnesses are dead?

Ross Greenwood writes gritty, heart-pounding thrillers, with twists aplenty, and unforgettable endings. Perfect for fans of Mark Billingham and Stuart MacBride.

Praise for Ross Greenwood:

‘Move over Rebus and Morse; a new entry has joined the list of great crime investigators in the form of Detective Inspector John Barton. A rich cast of characters and an explosive plot kept me turning the pages until the final dramatic twist.’ author Richard Burke

‘Master of the psychological thriller genre Ross Greenwood once again proves his talent for creating engrossing and gritty novels that draw you right in and won’t let go until you’ve reached the shocking ending.’ Caroline Vincent at Bitsaboutbooks blog

‘Ross Greenwood doesn’t write clichés. What he has written here is a fast-paced, action-filled puzzle with believable characters that’s spiced with a lot of humour.’ author Kath Middleton

Our Review

I love the Epigram, ‘Only the dead know the truth.’ and how true this is for this book.

One of my favourite detectives, John Barton, is having to cover his DCI’s position while she is on maternity leave, giving him two jobs to handle.

He doesn’t usually like to be restricted to the office so much, but I think he could be persuaded to like it. He has more freedom, although this doesn’t help with his latest case.

I couldn’t figure it out either.

The Ice Killer is a most unusual case, not really a crime thriller in the normal sense of the word. At least, not what I would expect from Ross Greenwood, as proving guilt would seem difficult in this story, if not impossible.

Personally, I cannot label the main suspect as a killer, far more a victim of life and circumstance, in my opinion.

The Ice Killer is two stories running side by side, a fascinating and beautifully written mix, but one I thoroughly enjoyed reading. It certainly challenged all my perceptions.

Ross Greenwood has the unique ability to allow us to live inside all the characters heads and hearts. A unique talent…

Ross Greenwood Ice Killer Banner

#Keepitalive ~ #Whatdoyousee ~ #WDYS ~ #Poetry

Keep it alive

What do you see # 57 November 23, 2020

Image credit: Angéle Kamp @ Unsplash

( For the visually challenged reader, the image shows a single cupcake with a lit candle on top of it)

Happy birthday, Sadje!

On blackened boards, the darkest space
In memory of the birthday cakes
I never received
From my daughter’s birthday spread
I placed it there,
to light the dark days
Remembered…

© anita dawes 2020

Muse less…

Diana Peach shared a lovely post the other day, about an interesting conversation she had with one of her muses. We have all been invited to share our own experiences…

I wasn’t surprised to find Samuel, my strange muse/mentor sitting in my office that afternoon.

The house was quiet, Anita was having a nap. I had planned to spend time on the WIP, but I already knew I would be wasting my time.

Summoning up the ghost of a smile, I wondered what I was in for this time. He never came just to talk about the weather.

“I’m surprised you can still smile, Jaye, with everything that has been happening in your world. I do not need to ask how you are, or Anita for that matter, as I have been observing you both for weeks.”

I breathe a sigh of relief and slowly sink into my chair. Here, at least, might I find some practical sympathy and advice?

“Now, there’s not much I can do about outside influences, but putting your writing back on track should help, as I have always found this to be a great help in my own life. For a start, your latest work in progress has been on a back burner for far too long. The secret of getting ahead is getting started and I am glad to see that you are making a start. But … your character ARCs need work, and your main character needs an ally. I also think you have the wrong point of view and at least one misplaced character.”

He proceeded to list everything that was wrong with my current WIP. Most of which made perfect sense, as usual. His comments uplifted me, and my depression retreated into the next room. My head bursting with fresh ideas, I just had to write them down.

I stopped writing and looked up to thank him, but he had gone, leaving just the faint memory of pipe tobacco smoke and the memory of his snowy moustache…

When I first started writing, people often spoke about their muses. I didn’t seem to have one or understand what they were going on about. I sometimes heard that Jiminy Cricket voice in my head but didn’t think that was what they meant. Anyway, that voice only ever told me what not to do, so not much help really.

I have had to be stubbornly independent for most of my life, always finding it difficult to accept criticism advice, so assumed I didn’t need a muse and quite happy without one.

So early in 2019, when I wrestled with Silent Payback, Samuel came to see me, and I finally had me a muse of my own. You can read about that meeting here… https://jenanita01.com/2018/11/19/jayes-journal-an-unexpected-visitor/

He only visits when he knows I need sorting out, and I often think of messing up, just for a visit…

© Jaye Marie 2020

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge…

Colleen M. Chesebro

This month’s theme is a haiku written by Sue Vincent:

                   clouds cover the moon,
                 beyond dawn's pale horizon
                     sun rises unseen

                     ©2020 Sue Vincent

Image by Pixabay.com

The
hidden
Mystery
Unknowable
Held fast by puzzling
The true mind needs to play
To solve, to find the unseen
In dark corners laid down by mind
old tales hidden by pale horizon
stories worth searching for brought back to life…

© anita dawes 2020

#Flash Fiction Challenge for Carrot Ranch Literary Community

November 19: Flash Fiction Challenge

November 19, 2020, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story that glorifies a toilet. Capture the marvel and status and love for a contraption we’d rather not mention.

I am old enough to remember sitting on an outdoor toilet, or privy as some people call them.

How dark it was in Winter, with spiders lurking, patiently waiting to drop on your head while you spent a penny.

If you go back far enough in time, hardly anyone had indoor plumbing. The age of an outdoor water pump and a tin bath in front of the fire. Just one bath full of warm water for everyone on the family to use.

I often used to wonder if the last person came out dirtier than when they went in!

© Jaye Marie 2020

‘Fiction In A Flash Challenge. Week #26 Entry #IARTG #WritingCommunity #FlashFiction ~ @pursoot

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I remember a time before my furry covering
Soft stuffing, these dark button eyes
I lived in Switzerland, my eyes were blue
I remember the snow, the slope smooth,
like mothers icing on our Christmas cake
Before the visitors come
With their puff jackets and skis
Father making sure there is enough wood chopped
To keep our visitors warm
Before they mess up my smooth slopes
That feels like a long time ago
I am here now in England with a nice family
I like my red waistcoat
I love being cuddled by Annabelle
Who likes to sit me by the fire
When she is busy doing something for her mum
All in all, I think life isn’t too bad
Apart from the days when I miss the snow…

© anita dawes 2020

Dark Gods… #Poetry

Dark Gods

There are Gods that have no light
They live in darkness
Dwell on sorrow, feed on fear
They drop nightmares like rain
We never feel them enter our minds
We never see the dark shadow
that falls across our soul
Nor hear the dark composer of our thoughts
When fear calls, we stand to attention
Dark whispers scratch the mind
Push us forward when we should turn away
How hard is it, to just say no…?

© anita dawes 2020