Anita’s Heart, and where we are now…

Image by Thomas B. from Pixabay

Seven years ago, when I had my heart attack, I was rushed to hospital in the middle of the night. The ambulance crew ran the tests on the way, and when I arrived at the hospital, I was taken straight to the Cath Lab, where a stent was fitted in the failing artery.

I went home the following day, as right as ninepence…

I know most of the family were expecting something similar when Anita collapsed and was diagnosed with heart failure last week.

Unfortunately, she was not so lucky.

This past week has been upsetting, confusing and frustrated us all to hell and back. Due mainly to the restricted access to information because of Covid 19. We couldn’t visit Anita, and the doctors are so busy, nailing one of them down for a detailed explanation was well nigh impossible. We had to gradually piece together all the scraps of information until we had a clearer picture, but the result of our detective work was heart breaking. Ours that is…

Not only did Anita have a nasty chest infection, and a build up of fluid on her lungs, but her heart was so severely damaged that any treatment apart from medication would probably have killed her.

So we, and the doctors played a waiting game for most of the week, adjusting her medication repeatedly until she began to respond. Anita didn’t become stable (don’t you just love that expression?) until late on Thursday.

And this is where the confusion started again in earnest. They began talking about Anita coming home over the weekend. But how could she come home without any treatment for her damaged ticker?

It wasn’t until we became first class pests that we learned of their plan.

Because of Covid 19 and the incredible workload at the hospital, and taking into account Anita’s increasing cabin fever, it was decided to allow her to come home to continue to recover until she was well enough for an MRI to assess the extent of the damage to her heart. Only then would they know how to treat it.

So, as of late Saturday afternoon, we collected Anita and became official carers. Armed with a pharmacy of pills, a strict regime, and orders to make sure she rested, we knew it was down to us to keep her going…

But I am sure that all your good wishes, hugs and healing prayers played a huge part in getting Anita this far, and we (the whole Dawes family) thank you all from the bottom of our hearts!

Breaking News!

These are virtual flowers for Anita

Yesterday was a very bad day for all the family.

We received a worrying update from the hospital that literally ripped us all to pieces. We all cried as the enormity of the doctors words slowly sank in. Anita’s heart was so seriouly damaged that the only thing they could safely do for her at the moment, was to continue all the medications and hope she could rally under her own steam.

This morning I was determined to try and speak to Anita, as they did say it might be possible and that was good enough for me. The hospital phone line was busy for the longest time but when they finally answered me and I was put through to the ward, I was told there was a phone in her room and if I hung for a minute, she would get me the number.

Minutes later, I heard Anita’s voice…

I expected to hear a frail old lady, for that was how she looked the last time I saw her. Imagine my surprise, when the voice I knew so well, greeted me with all the bounce and enthusism I knew of old. She sounded well, strong and as cheerful as always. Of course, I gently quizzed her for details and everything she spoke of sounded hopeful and encouraging. They were really impressed with her progress and even mentioned being able to go home at the weekend!

We talked for ages, passing the phone back and forth with her son Stephen, and when we finally signed off as they had come to check on something, it was two very relieved people who hung up the phone. We passed the phone number on to the rest of the family, as they were desperate to hear her voice too.

Tomorrow we hope to hear when they will be taking Anita to the Cath Lab for an angiogram to assess the damage and the necessary treatment…

We are so grateful for all the prayers and good wishes coming in from all over the world, and I’m sure they all had a part in her amazing progress!

This week in the Den of Doom…

Jaye's Journal x12

 

The lockdown and isolation has entered the Den of Doom (my office) with a vengeance this week.

We have tried desperately to maintain an optimistic attitude about everything, including all those annoying PC malfunctions. I seem to spend more and more time trying to catch up, meaning I never manage to get around to anything creative anymore.

So much so, our respective muses have been AWOL for days!

Undaunted, I had been looking forward to working on the new bonsai shelves. The wood has arrived and so did the freezing weather. I don’t do freezing to death as my old bones refuse to function below a certain temperature.

So, the waiting will continue…

Shame, for I was looking forward to spending hours away from the computer.

 

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Life isn’t waiting for me…

 

In the middle of the week, I started what I thought was a bad cold, streaming nose and sneezing. Of course, I immediately thought I was dying, but relieved to discover that sneezing is not a symptom of the Covid19 virus.

When the tickly cough arrived, I slipped into denial in a hurry.

The experts say that most people will only get mild symptoms and recover quickly, but not people over 75 who also have serious medical problems like heart conditions, asthma and hypertension, also like me.

Denial is a wonderful coping mechanism and I’m pretty sure I’m not dying. In the past I have beaten some usually fatal conditions, so not expecting to lose this battle either if it turns out that I do have it.

The good news is my temperature is normal and I feel fine…

 

Bcgrpknni

 

#Jaye’s Journal… Enjoying a happy moment!

 

Jaye's Journal x12.jpg

 

I have been escaping to the garden more and more lately. The weather has been slowly improving, so I should be able to start working on that very long list of jobs that need to be done.

The need to escape, even to the garden, has been gradually building as the news of this evil virus gets worse.

Everyone is getting edgy, wondering how bad it might get. I have always been an optimist, but I can feel it straining to assert itself.

The shops are empty, and the worry swings between getting sick or starving to death. Some choice, eh?

But… (changing the subject, as I’d rather not dwell on things I can’t do much about)

My bonsai are waking up and this never fails to cheer me up, although this year it seems to be just a little subdued.

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My Acer says hello…

I have been busy making sure I have everything I need for the repotting marathon, and the wood for the new shelving should be delivered soon.

The rain-sodden grass has been trying to dry out and although I didn’t feel like cutting it, I thought I had better get to it. Just as well I did, for it poured with rain the following day.

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The rest of the garden is waking up too and did my heart good to see my favourites have survived for another year.

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My favourite Camelia

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Not sure what this is called, but I love it!

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Forsythia, everyone’s favourite

Back indoors I try to come to terms with the virus situation. I can forget everything when I’m in the garden, but it waits for me the minute I come back in.

So many things are likely to change and to be honest, I’m terrified. The situation gets worse every day, yet no one seems to know how bad it will get.

Every time I wash my hands, I think about the people who have already died and pray there won’t be many more.

That a miracle will arrive and save us all…

 

©Jaye Marie 2020

 

Sharing a post from Susanne Lakin from @livewritethrive.com

I read this inspirational post this morning from Susanne Lakin @livewritethrive.com and had to share it here…

 

Wake Up and Pay Attention. This Is Not a Drill
Hi writer friend,

I don’t know what you think about the corona virus. But one thing I do know: a lot of people are NOT taking this threat seriously. There are a number of states here in the US in which there are no restrictions in place. Where people are crowding in malls and going out to restaurants and ignoring all the warnings and precautions.

Can I just say this is not just stupid but deadly? Honestly, as Howard Dean said the other night about the young people cramming the beaches in Florida, thinking they are immortal or something (I’m paraphrasing here): Great. Have fun. Now you will go home and be responsible for killing your grandparents. You want that on your conscience?

In China, about 70% of all deaths were due to exposure to family members with the virus.

In Italy, families tend to be very close, and so their young people spread the virus to their elders and killed them.

I want to share a part of an email I got today from my friend Brian in Italy. Please read this:
“Thanks for your message, thoughts and prayers. It means a lot.

The situation here is really tragic. I actually live in Codogno, the small town where the first case was discovered. We’ve been in lockdown for nearly a month now: same here, everything closed except essentials.

I’ve never seen anything like this: each time I open Facebook, I see news about someone who has passed away. In our village alone we’ve had close to 100 dead in about 3 weeks.

Of course, being such a small town, we all know each other, so it’s even harder when you ‘get the news’ and you knew the person.

Hospitals are almost full and will soon reach the point where they won’t be able to cope anymore. And there’s still a lot of people who don’t understand how serious this is. You see them in the streets, in parks, etc.

We can only pray this goes away soon and that everything goes back to normal in a relatively short time.

Fortunately I, my wife and our 6-month old son are ok. We’re at home and never go out. As things stand, that seems to be the best and only cure.

Praying that it doesn’t affect you guys as bad as it is doing us.”

I guess Brian didn’t get the memo and images we have–that doctors are more than overrun in Italy and are having to choose who lives and who dies. I’m sure there are governments around the world worse than ours–not telling their citizens the truth of the dangers and statistics.

In the US, our president doesn’t want to look bad (if the virus numbers prove to be high), so though he has promised for weeks we will get test kits, which seems easy for the rest of the world to get, he isn’t delivering. We are being fed so many lies for political reasons. And because the US administration delayed months in preparing for this virus, we are now two weeks behind Italy’s dire situation, if even that.

So … you’re a writer. There is no more critical time than now to use your words.

Don’t spread lies. Don’t soften the danger. Use your words to tell others to stay home. To help those in need.

Call your local and state mayors and governors and representatives and tell them to start preparing for the flood of virus patients. They can commandeer stadiums and empty hotels to become makeshift hospitals. Tell them we must make manufacturing companies to switch gears and make ventilators and respirators and hospital masks and gowns. We did this during WWII. We certainly can do this now.

We may only have days, not even weeks, to help prevent thousands of deaths.

A study shockingly shows that if those in China had started isolating and shutting down gatherings even ONE DAY earlier, they would have prevented about 67% of the deaths. Conversely, if they had waited one more day, there would have been 67% more deaths.

I could go on and on. As Dr. Fauci, highly respected expert says, we should err on the side of being cautious and excessive. When you or your loved ones are dead, it’s too late to regret you weren’t more careful.

Stay home. Just stay home.

If you need to go to get groceries or something essential, go, but sanitize everything. Every grocery item you bring home, wipe it down with a bleach/soap/water solution. Let every item stay wet for 4 minutes before putting away. Sanitize every box that gets delivered before you open it. You can read all the guidelines recommended.

Keep in mind that the virus particles can stay viable in the air for 5 HOURS. That means if you go to the market and someone sick coughed hours earlier, you can still get sick. Masks do NOT protect from the virus. Keep using sanitizer as you shop. Wipe everything down, especially your phone and any touchpads or counters you touch. If you use gloves, be sure you don’t touch any part of your body while wearing them. Throw them out before you get to your car, then sanitize your hands, your car door, your steering wheel. Don’t take the germs home. I sanitize every piece of mail I get out of the mailbox.

But don’t just follow the guidelines. Tell everyone you know. Do what some are doing in cities when they see people in groups in the streets: they are yelling out windows: “Go home and stop spreading the virus!”

Think about my friend Brian. A month or two ago, he was happy living in his beautiful peaceful Italian village raising his baby with hope on the horizon. Now he is surrounded by death, losing many of his neighbors and friends every day. Who will be left in his village months from now, if/when the threat passes. We are being told this could go on for 1-2 years.

Yes, this is an emergency. It’s a war. You have words. Now is the time to use them to fight for our lives. There is no better use of your words right now. Make people wake up and pay attention. Share on social media. Call friends. Get those people in Texas and Oklahoma and Florida and Idaho to wake up and stop spreading this deadly virus.

If the statistics come true for the US as with China or Italy, it’s predicted maybe 70-80% of All Americans will get the virus. Let’s say 200 million people. If only 1% die, that’s 2 million. The virus seems to be killing about 3%. That’s 6 million dead.

Sure, ignore it if you want. Pretend, like Trump, this will suddenly vanish, just disappear. The experts say otherwise.

Better to be safe than sorry. I agree with Michael Moore (listen to his podcast Rumble for more specific statistics) that the worst that can happen if you’re wrong is some people will make fun of you and say you were too melodramatic. So what? Do you care? I don’t. I’d rather save some lives than worry about what people think of me.

Enough for now. I’m sad. I’m angry. But I’m also so grateful to see so many people helping others. I’m working to set up a fund today with my church to make sure everyone has enough money to pay their bills. Many of my friends have been laid off this week. Why don’t you look into doing that? Or find a local reputable agency or church that is helping your community. You reap what you sow. Share the wealth, even if you have little. Surely you have more than someone else, something you can spare.

If you’re sitting around at home, don’t get depressed. Get busy helping. With your words.

Words have power. Use them.

My prayers are with you all.

~ C. S. Lakin

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