Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge… #Nonet

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 113, Happy December! Poets Choice of Words

 

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Broken Ground

I fight my way back through snow and rain

My home close, I see chimney smoke

Windows lit by lanterns glow

My path lay deep with snow

The lake forgotten

I hear the sound

Ice cracking

Beneath

Cold

Ground

Feet wet

Sinking fast

My heart freezing

Hope disappearing

I am lost to this world

My voice blown back by the wind

No help has come to pull me free

I pray the Lord, my soul he will free…

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For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the link to learn about each type:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change ingeneral.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquainvariations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use also. Please add what forms you are using so we can learn from you.

Etheree The Etheree poem consists of ten lines of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 syllables. Etheree can also be reversed and written 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. The trick is to create a memorable message within the required format. Poets can get creative and write an Etheree with more than one verse, but the idea is to follow suit with an inverted syllable count. Reversed Etheree Syllable Count: 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 Double Etheree Syllable Count: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 10, 9, 8, 7, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

Nonet: The Nonet poem is similar to the Etheree, but with only nine lines. The first line has nine syllables, the second line eight syllables, the third line seven syllables, etc… until line nine finishes with one syllable. It can be written about any subject and should not rhyme.

After writing a double Nonet, the visual image result is that of an hourglass shape. Because of this shape, these poems often discuss the passage of time.

Shadorma: The Shadorma is a poetic form consisting of a six-line stanza (or sestet). Each stanza has a syllable count of three syllables in the first line, five syllables in the second line, three syllables in the third and fourth lines, seven syllables in the fifth line, and five syllables in the sixth line (3/5/3/3/7/5) for a total of 26 syllables.

When writing a Shadorma I would concentrate on a specific subject. The brevity of syllables is perfect for that kind of structure.

A poem may consist of one stanza or an unlimited number of stanzas (a series of shadormas).

 

10 thoughts on “Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge… #Nonet

  1. Pingback: Colleen’s #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge Recap No. 113th, 1st of Month: Poets Choice of Words – Colleen Chesebro ~ The Faery Whisperer

  2. Pingback: A Little Trumpet Blowing! | anita dawes and jaye marie

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