Wonder Woman…

Yes, the Wonder Woman has returned!

And looking surprisingly well after her ordeal and determined to carry on where she left off before the proverbial stuff hit the fan.

Anita also came home with even more medication than last time, plus a daily injection, all of which to be carefully administered by little old me.

We also have a new set of worries, due mainly to the fact that Anita is still not fixed, not quite yet. It will take a pacemaker to do that. Her heart must settle down first, clear the rather large clot that is preventing the left side of her heart from working properly, and recover enough for a pacemaker to be possible.

This requires an intense regime of blood thinners and warfarin, a nasty drug that needs constant monitoring and blood tests. All worth it if the pacemaker returns Anita to full health!

Turns out it wasn’t a second heart attack after all. Due to the massive damage the first one caused and the presence of a large clot inside Anita’s heart, it just couldn’t cope. It stopped minutes after we arrived at the emergency department. Luckily, they managed to bring her back, but it was touch and go for a while.

Apparently, the first heart attack was what they like to call the widow maker because it is usually fatal.

So the fact Anita is here at all is miraculous and something we are all grateful for…

The Update I never wanted to post…

This is the most upsetting post I have ever written, but you have all been so kind and supportive of Anita, I knew I had to tell you what’s been happening and ask for even more thoughts and prayers…

Waiting and worrying was bad enough, but when Anita began to show signs of distress, we were thrown into a very different ball game.

She kept insisting she was fine, but late on Saturday night her breathing became seriously laboured and alarm bells were ringing loud and clear. We managed to persuade her to go back to the hospital as we thought she was having another heart attack.

On the way there, she deteriorated rapidly, moaning in pain, and gasping for breath, causing Stephen (number one son) to drive like a boy racer and run at least one red light, as we knew every minute counted.

Just the mention of a heart attack set the well-oiled wheels of the emergency department in motion, leaving me and Stephen standing outside the hospital, barely holding back the tears.

That’s when it became serious.

Within minutes, a nurse came out to us to say oxygen was being administered and a full barrage of tests had begun. Anita’s blood pressure was so low it was on the floor and there was fluid in her lungs again. Her heart was failing and she had been put on life support.

Last time we were here, just 10 weeks ago, we were not allowed inside the hospital and had to wait in the car. This time, however, we were taken to the relative’s lounge, causing weird alarm signals to us both. Were they just being kind now that lockdown was easing, or was there a more sinister reason?

An hour later, the on-call consultant came to update us, and he didn’t mince his words. He said that Anita’s heart was failing, and she was extremely poorly and that we had brought her in the nick of time. A few minutes more and she might have died.

He went on to talk about resuscitation, that due to Anita’s age and condition, resuscitation would not be in her best interest. He didn’t ask for our permission to do anything, but the message was clear, he didn’t expect Anita to make it.

After he left, we clung together and bawled like babies, desperately praying he was wrong.

We later found out that they had to cut Anita’s clothing away, such was the urgency, and this still makes me cry every time I think about it.

But…

 sometime on Sunday, Anita began to rally, surprising the medical staff. They couldn’t figure out what was causing the problem, for all the tests were coming back normal but she wasn’t about to go anywhere! 

When we mentioned the recent MRI, we had the feeling they didn’t have any information about this. I wonder if they might have lost it.

Early on Monday, I picked up the phone to hear Anita’s voice! She had begged to use the hospital phone and it was beyond wonderful to hear her voice and she sounded so normal as she listed her requests. She was still in intensive care, so hardly normal, but she sounded great to me!

Tomorrow, they have a load more tests lined up, tests that they are confident will give them some important answers…

I was just going to post this when some welcome news turned up!

They have discovered a blood clot inside her heart, and her arteries are no longer clear. There will be further tests, including an angiogram tomorrow, which may result in the application of stents.  All this, although distressing, is proof that this time she won’t be coming home until fit for purpose!

As testament to her improving health, she is busy writing in her hospital bed, and we talk frequently on the phone about everything!

#BlogBattle ~ Wretched

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#BlogBattle: Wretched

Blogbattle_WRETCHED

July 2020 Blog Battle

The word this month is:

Wretched


(Dictionary definition)

Living in misery
Attended by misery and woes
Inferior in performance or quality
Very unpleasant: deplorable

For the past two weeks, it has been a case of all the above, since Anita, the head of our family had a nasty heart attack. She also had pneumonia, which was complicating matters even further, but due to the corona virus lockdown, we were not allowed to visit her in the hospital.

So for seven miserable and wretched days we worried our socks off at home, wondering what was going on and how Anita was feeling.

On the third day, we managed to acquire the number of the telephone, which was conveniently right next to Anita’s bed, which enabled us to speak to her and find out how she was feeling and what had been happening. This contact was a godsend for all of us and went a long way to keeping us from self-detonating!

Anita is back home now, but the misery is still present, although not as intense as it was before, as she is still very ill. She has extensive damage to her heart and as yet no way of knowing the exact prognosis. There is a waiting list for the MRI which will ascertain the damage, but until that day arrives, wretched will unfortunately be the order of the day…

Strange Timing #Poetry

Strange Timing!

Walking home from the library
A man rushing in the opposite direction
bumped into me, almost knocking me off my feet.
If I hadn’t stood with my mouth open
Wanting to let loose a few blue words
I would have stepped off the kerb
Instead of the young man just ahead of me
Now lying in the road in front of a black cab.
I should have been the one lying there
I couldn’t help feeling that death
would be waiting around every corner
to collect the soul he had missed.
Was it strange timing,
or an angel that had bumped my shoulder?

©anitadawes 2020


Heartbreaking News!

Strange timing indeed, when I chose this poem by Anita for todays post, for late yesterday afternoon, we had to rush Anita to the emergency department as she was desperately ill.

She had been unwell all week but had really gone hill on Sunday. She was in a lot of pain, having trouble breathing and felt clammy, although her temperature was normal. I used my machine to test her blood pressure and that’s when the alarm bells started to ring in earnest. It was so high that we knew we had to persuade her to go to the hospital.

Not an easy job, as she hates anything to do with doctors and always refuses to go, even when we beg! Calmly and without letting the panic show too much, we finally managed to drive her to our nearest hospital. They took one look and led her straight through, past the triage and the waiting area.

Because of Covid 19, we were not allowed to enter the hospital, which was upsetting for all of us, and had to sit in the car park while they did their initial checks.

Two hours later, a nurse, complete with mask and gloves came over to us and delivered the worst news. Anita had fluid in her lungs and was having a serious heart attack. She was being given pain relief and oxygen, and a series of tests were being done. We were told to go home, as she would be staying overnight while they tried to stabilise the situation.

An angiogram was mentioned, something I knew all about, for I had one when I had my own heart attack. This usually indicates the need for a stent, a tiny device to keep the offending artery open, and mine is still doing its job, some six years later.

Driving home without her was terrible, but we know she is in the best possible place.

Today, we wait to hear good news and the house feels so empty…