Promo for an Introvert

I admit I am a little…eccentric. I pay attention to the phases of the moon and Mercury Retrogrades. I buy new outfits when Venus tours my sun sign. I listen to psychics. Well, sometimes. I tend to go with my gut first. The thing about trusting your gut is, if you are an introvert like me, it can hold you back. Keep you in your comfort zone. This means, if you’re a writer, you won’t promote your novels much.

Yet I find myself in the middle of a massive (for me) promotional campaign. I’m not sure how it happened. Two psychics told me I should “take a bigger stage” that it was “my destiny.” I doubted my inner voice saying “NO! Stay home and write.” It felt a bit cowardly. After all, I had to launch three books in three months. And so I talked myself into hiring a PR…

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Twitter for the Indie Author by @JoRobinson176

Lit World Interviews

For those of you scribblers just joining Twitter for the very first time, there are a couple of tips and tools to know about that will make your tweeting life a little more fun. First the basics. Once you’ve signed up with Twitter and replaced that old egg with your author photo, it’s time to start socialising. You can only see the tweets of people who you follow, and likewise, only people who follow you will see your tweets. The way to get followers when you’re new to Twitter is to start following others. Search for people to follow by name or by putting things like writer, author, photographer, gardener, or any other thing that you are interested in, and follow away. I don’t follow many Twitter sites that don’t follow me back, but that is up to you. As a newbie this is important though, because when you are…

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5 observations on the necessity of owning a feather duster…

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

To some the humble feather duster may conjure nostalgic visions of French maids and uniforms, to others they are a rather retro adjunct to the broom cupboard. To me, they are a necessity. Every home should have one. No question. I can give you my reasons…

1. They are, obviously, useless for really dusting… on the other hand you can whip round with a feather duster and do the entire house in less than five minutes without moving a thing when you get that call to say unexpected guests will arrive in ten… For a writer, this is paramount, as dusting comes a long way down the scale of priorities when in full flow.

Plus it gives you five minutes to get out of the pyjamas and make yourself presentable.

2. For the vertically challenged amongst us, they are, of course, ideal for cobwebs. This is part of their primary…

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Death By EL James

profoundly funny…

Tara Sparling writes

When I threatened to kill a bunny by reading it EL James’ Grey until it ran headlong and arse-ways into traffic, some thought me callous. Some thought me justified, because the furry little gits give them nightmares. Someone else coined the phrase “Death by EL James”, which immediately sounded to me like a great story title.

So without further ado, here are not one, but five – count ’em! – five different versions, in five different genres, of Death By EL James. (I have yet to take action on the bunny – it all depends on whether you’ll vote for me in the 2015 Irish Blog Awards here and here before September 21st. Just sayin’)

Death By EL James

1. Literal

Oh, my! she thought, as he came with the knife. Was he going to stab her? She’d never been stabbed before. But she was sure it would be delicious. It was a very large and magnificent knife. She was sure none of the…

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Slov worm etc…

Bless you, Ailsa…

The Bingergread Cottage

I’m getting over my panic attack about not speaking Slovenian. Having now mastered “Thank You” I’m off and running. It is very good for my soul to be somewhere I am unable to communicate – humbling and a lesson. Yes, of course, mostly we are relying on the good-will of the people we meet and getting by in German or English. This is helped by the fact that these are people selling us stuff.

I noticed before during our long trip up to Estonia that this is the big difference between Western and Eastern Europe – people are still very suspicious here. I suppose if I’d lived two generations under the Stasi, wondering constantly if my neighbours were snitching on me, I’d be damn suspicious of strangers, especially grinning morons who say “Hello” when they don’t know me.

Yesterday we took Lily for a walk down through the village –…

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Hill figures – Capturing History

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

Avebury SE weekend 035 White Horse of Uffington

One of the most striking things you can see as you drive through the English countryside is the great white shape of a hill figure cut into the landscape. There are many to see, at least fifty known figures, ranging from the very recent to the ancient. Some are famous the world over, like the White Horse at Uffington that dates back the best part of 3,000 years. Others are less well known, even in England.

Marlborough White Horse Marlborough White Horse

Thousands of people must daily drive past the Whiteleaf Cross and never notice it. A large triangular base surmounted …these days… by a cross, cut into the chalk of a wooded hillside. The earliest known reference to the figure dates back only to 1742, but it shares the hillside with a far earlier Iron Age hillfort and barrows. Was there once a more ancient figure, later Christianised…

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