Depthless

Pen of the Damned

I open my eyes to the depthless black that surrounds me. Blinking rapidly in an attempt to restore my vision, I feel panic rise. I close my eyes, breathe deeply, and try to calm myself. I open them again, nothing has changed. The pitch is deeper than night; it is an inky blackness that plays tricks on my mind. Every now and again, I see a halo bloom and dissipate as quickly as it appears. Encouraged, I scramble toward the beacon of hope believing it to be a source of true light. As each teasing brightness dissolves I grow less expectant, more desperate. I crawl forward frantically seeking the phantom visions. I soon realize the stone floor I’m scurrying across is uneven; worn smooth in some areas, unhewn and rough in others with scattered protrusions. My hand inadvertently strikes a particularly jagged rock that tears my palm open. I pitch…

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Saturday Finally Arrived…

Image by Pixabay.com

 I’m sure it wasn’t my imagination, but last week seemed to crawl … each day longer than the one before as we waited for the day of the MRI to arrive…

Apart from the time Anita broke her ankle a few years ago – she hasn’t needed any medical attention in the last fifty years, which is just as well, for she wouldn’t have gone anyway! She hates doctors and hospitals, but luckily, always been disgustingly healthy…. which has left her without the patience necessary for a sick person!

When Saturday finally arrived, our nerves were stretched to the limit. There were quite a few iffy moments, moments where Anita swore (literally) that she wouldn’t be going, that she couldn’t stand any more of the waiting and worrying. I tried hard not to dwell on what might happen if she stuck her heels in, but luckily, she didn’t push it.

We gave ourselves two hours to get to Basingstoke hospital as we hadn’t been there before and uncertain about the route and the traffic.

Better to arrive miles to early than to risk being late!

We hadn’t gone far before we were diverted. I should have known then that fate was having a laugh, for this diversion seemed to encompass the whole of Hampshire, taking us far away from Basingstoke. I didn’t think we would ever find it the blessed place. The satnav was as confused as we were, kept changing her mind and issuing ridiculous directions. In the end, we simply followed the diversion signs and prayed we wouldn’t end up in Land’s End.

Fate didn’t stop laughing when we finally drove into the hospital car park, either. It was the wrong one for the MRI clinic. By this time, we were all frazzled, and there was steam coming out of Anita’s ears!

We finally found it with literally minutes to spare…

We were not allowed into the waiting room, so retired to the car. Luckily, we managed to grab a free coffee and found somewhere shady to drink it in.

The MRI took just over an hour, and from Anita’s account, it was a miserable experience. The room was too hot, the machine cramped and noisy, and she had to keep her face mask on all the time.

When she emerged, with large dressings on both arms from the injections, she looked exhausted, but extremely glad to see us.

Image by Pixabay.com

Driving home, exhausted but glad it was all over, our stomachs started rumbling, so when we spotted a Welcome Break nestled among the trees, we didn’t hesitate. We ended up eating our lunch in the middle of a beautiful pine forest, a peaceful haven so far removed from the morning we just had as it was possible to get. The fried chicken never tasted so good!

Image by Pixabay.com

The only thing left to do now, is wait for the verdict!

P.S. We want to thank everyone for their good wishes, hugs and prayers… I really think they have helped so much with Anita’s recovery…

#Extract from Virtue by @JohnMoot1 #PubDay #ContemporaryFiction #Debut @mindbuckmedia #TuesdayBookBlog

Today I’m sharing an extract from Virtue, a novel by John Moot, on publication day. Here’s what the book is about…

The Holder family is in crisis. Hannah is sick of being a stay-at-home mom marooned in a rural college town, her teenage daughter, Madison, is the subject of anti-LBGTQ bullying, and her teenage son, Dillon, is failing at school and having run-ins with the law. Hannah wants out of a life that has grown toxic to her family and to reclaim the person she once was–a confident, professional woman. Her husband Tom, a philosophy professor, once supported her plea for change–a return to Boston that would give their kids a fresh start and her the chance to get her law degree–but now his life is unravelling as he struggles to fend off attacks on his career from the college president, reconcile with his estranged, cancer-stricken father and confront a…

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This Way Forward

I Write Her

the contract was signed long ago
determined to honor it then
and do still even now
today, tomorrow and forever
here doing what’s best
for the union of these two hearts

a lifetime of lessons
shows us that harmony is paramount
maturity can prevail
if we choose it
letting love take the lead
with dignity and grace

taking
the
path
of
least
obstruction

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REFLECTOR’S REFLECTIONS

Zoolon Audio

westernh4

The other day, even though it was silly hot I got up high to the part of the Western Heights where very few people go. This section of the Heights doesn’t overlook the sea, it’s the backside of The White Cliffs and a safe home for the wild things. There’s no call for masks up there. While there I got a few words together. I hadn’t expected that.


westernh3

You climbed into the mirror not the big picture
Trapped behind the looking glass you never got free
Dreams of tomorrow and yesterday’s sorrow
You could look but never could see


westernh1

In the storybook you lent me
Your autobiography with self-hate hate in mind
You told white lies to hide from the real stuff
You got best reviews from the deaf and the blind


westernh2

Hidden behind the reflector’s reflections
I guess as safe as anywhere this side of Mars
It’s a pity…

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