7 Steps To Take Before Submitting Your Manuscript To An Editor

Nicholas C. Rossis

I don’t often have the pleasure of hosting guest posts by editors, so I am particularly pleased with this one. Liam Carnahan looks at editing from the editor’s point of view, explaining what you need to do before you submit your manuscript to an editor. Liam is the founder and chief editor at Invisible Ink Editing. The team at Invisible Ink work with independent authors to help them prepare their manuscripts for submissions or publication. You can follow them on Facebook or Twitter.

7 Steps To Take Before Submitting Your Manuscript To An Editor

Book editing | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's book Image: Pexels

The self-editing process can be long and painful, and it’s often hard to know when you’re actually done fiddling with a draft. At some point, you have to stop yourself from making changes and submit to an editor.

Before you do that, there are some quick and easy steps you can take…

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Milestones

The Silent Eye

I came across an old post while I was rummaging through the files. It looked at the decades of an ordinary life…my life… and how the things that seem ordinary to you, while you are living them, can look very different to an observer. As I skimmed back through the paragraphs, I was watching the fish in the aquarium out of the corner of my eye. Two of the little loaches had ventured out to feed. They are shy creatures and I seldom see them, so I stopped to watch.

One of them was the original hitchhiking loach that had survived an almost waterless journey on a plant, the other was one of the juveniles I had procured to keep him company. The original loach has grown, losing the ‘vermisimilitude’ that had horrified me when I found him, and is looking far more like a fish, while the smaller…

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#Writephoto: Pinnacle

Today, I have beaten Anita to Sue Vincent’s #Writephoto entry!  This mysterious castle just called me and I couldn’t help myself!

 

pinnacle.jpg

 

Frozen Pinnacle

The air was so cold my lungs screamed with every breath and I had lost all feeling in my feet a while ago. Something I was grateful for, as they too had been in agony from the intense cold.

My breath seemed to hang in the air, inches from my face, the moisture rendered heavy enough to linger. I wanted to stop, to stand still and watch what would happen. Would my frozen breath drop to the ground like human snow?

However, I would not stop, not yet.

The snowy castle spires were visible now, appearing above the frozen trees as I drew closer. Each step became harder, every breath more painful. My thoughts scattering like snowflakes.

Defeat was visible now too, and I wondered if anyone would find me, a frozen statue still gazing at the distant destination…

 

©JayeMarie 2018https://scvincent.com/2018/05/24/thursday-photo-prompt-turrets-writephoto/

Why Every Horror Writer Needs A Nightmare Journal

Drew Chial

Writers are always told our fiction should be informed by our experiences, because the best stories have a kernel of truth to them. With this in mind we smuggle our quote books into our characters’ mouths. We cast colleagues as our leads, and we misappropriate our memoirs into our material. We find and replace our own names and over-share under aliases. We launder tell off speeches through nom de plumes and reveal our truth through jest.

We write what we know until we write the fantastic elements of our story. Then we drop that mantra completely. Without the experiences to draw from we use other methods to ground our stories. We impose rules on the impossible.

A ghost can pester the living from the further, but will be weaker than a person who dares to go there. A magician can project a torch flame across the room, but the heat…

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